Melmount Manor – The Dennett’s Christmas Project patchwork quilt begins

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Melmount Manor’s creative hands get to work on their upcoming festive patchwork quilt.

Nurse Hayley and Activity Co-ordinator Sophie are leading the team of residents to create their Christmas Quilt. They have received pieces of fabric from various visitors and staff. Pieces of fabric woven in Northern Ireland and donated by Liz the owner of Lizzienellie’s dress making cottage in Randalstown.  Spot the hounds tooth fabric!

What you need to know about patchwork quilting ( a lesson for all you history boffins) …

Patchwork and quilting have been practised as both practical and decorative crafts for centuries.  Their popularity has fluctuated according to changes in society and styles have developed according to resources available and the social status of the maker. Through a rich and interesting history the crafts have emerged as popular, relevant and widely practised in the 21st century, building on traditional skills and experimenting with contemporary artistic techniques.

Little is known about patchwork and quilting before the 18th century, and there are few surviving examples. The Quilters’ Guild Collection contains one of the earliest known dated patchworks, the 1718 Silk Patchwork Coverlet. Made by piecing over paper templates, the expensive silks used have been kept and treasured for decades before they were incorporated into the coverlet. Patchwork was a ladies’ leisure pursuit at this time, whilst quilting was considered a professional skill and plain quilts and quilted petticoats were popular, the latter being worn for fashionable daywear. Cialis is a drug widely used in the treatment of problems related to erectile dysfunction. It helps a man feel full-fledged, restores and makes a long-lasting erection. Immediately it should be noted that from the beginning to the withdrawal of the drug from the body of a man takes about 3 days. Read more at tadalafilhome.com.

Technological improvements in textile manufacture led to a fashionable phase of using printed cotton fabrics at the end of the 18th century, which continued in to the early 19th century.  For those who could afford it, expensive and high status printed cottons were often pieced together using the mosaic patchwork method, which also required another expensive commodity –  paper – to produce the templates. Simpler and cheaper fabrics were used by the lower classes in less complicated designs. By the middle of the century cottons were falling out of favour. The advent of roller printing had made cottons cheaper to produce and therefore widened their availability further down the social scale. In 1856 the first synthetic dye, Mauveine, was produced, followed by a vast range of bright colours, and the fashion shifted from printed cottons to vibrant silks and velvets. Mosaic patchwork cushions, throws, table covers and tea cosies adorned the cluttered parlours of Victorian homes. Baby blocks, log cabin, crazy and hexagon patchworks were all popular and often further embellished with embroidery and trimmings.

The late 19th and early 20th century saw the heyday of the Wholecloth quilt, a traditional skill passed on through the generations in Wales, the North Country and the Scottish Borders. In the North Country, quilt ‘stampers’ were professional markers who drew designs onto plain or pieced tops, whilst in Wales professional quilters would travel around making quilts to order. Each area developed their own particular style and popular motifs, with feathers and twisted ropes common in the North Country and leaves and spirals often found in Wales.

The 20th century was a time of great fluctuation. The interruption of two world wars and a dramatic shift in society led to a scarcity of available materials and decline in traditional skills. Competition from commercially manufactured alternatives meant traditional quilts seemed time consuming and undesirable. However, some people could still see their value, and continued to practise, teach and research patchwork and quilting, leading to an eventual resurgence of interest in the 1960s and ’70s. In 1979 The Quilters’ Guild was formed with the intention of ensuring the traditional crafts of patchwork and quilting were passed on, and to represent a new wave of quilters to take the craft into the 21st century.

Melmount residents and staff carry on this very worthwhile traditional craft, an art that can be enjoyed by all. Residents, relatives and staff are very excited about this new project and all looking forward to the finished item for Christmas.

Any fabric pieces gratefully accepted.

Larchwood Care (NI) Limited
First Floor

Unit 16 Crescent Industrial Estate
Ballinderry Road
Lisburn

BT28 2GN

Tel: 028 92 669 360

9 June 2021

Following guidance from the Department of Health received 8 June 2021, the visiting arrangements outlined previously 10 May 2020 remain in place for a further 3 weeks, with a proposed review 22 June 2021.  As such the following arrangements remain the policy for visits to any Larchwood Care Ni Home.

Virtual, Window, End of Life Visiting and Care Partners

There have not been any changes in the arrangements for the above visiting opportunities. All continue to be available within the Homes and can be booked, where necessary, through the Home Administrator.

General Visiting

In line with the Regional guidelines referenced above Larchwood Care NI is also facilitating General and Room Visits. The difference between a General Visit and a Room Visit is the location in which they take place within the Home. A General Visit will take place within the designated visiting area of the Home and a Room Visit, for those residents unable to come to the visiting area, will take place in the Resident’s room.

All General and Room visits must be pre-booked and you will be asked a series of risk assessment questions as part of this booking process. Booking can take place Monday – Friday 1000 – 1100 hours or 1400-1500 hours, by phoning the Care Home. The following guidelines will help you to understand the process and arrangements for both types of visits

- Book in advance.
- Undertake risk assessment over the phone.
- 2 visitors may visit twice per week per week for maximum 60 minutes.
- Visitors may include children. Children are included within the maximum 2 persons per visit.
- Arrive to the Home wearing a face mask 20 minutes prior to your visiting slot.
- All visitors will be swabbed using a rapid antigen COVID-19 test.
- You will be asked to wait until the result of your test is confirmed as negative
- You will be provided with an apron, but do not have to wear gloves.
- You may touch and hold hands with the resident. At this stage hugging is discouraged.

In facilitating this wide range of visiting activities and care partner arrangements you will understand the burden placed on staff time to undertake the administration and facilitation of these. Each Home will therefore have a maximum number of general and virtual visits available per week and we would ask that all relatives, family and friends are understanding of this.

In addition to visiting, independently mobile residents may avail of meeting with relatives in the grounds and gardens of the Homes. At this stage non-staff facilitated trips away from the Home are not accommodated.

The plans phases 2 and 3 are outlined below, however dates for implementation are now on hold until further reviews are conducted.  The next review date is 22 June 2021 and the Department of Health will release advice at this time.

Phase 2 – date to be agreed (subject to change)

All the above risk management protocols will be in place with the following changes.

- Maximum of 4 people from 2 households may visit twice per week
- Introduction of “brief hugging”
- Risk assessed trips outside of the Home.
- Hairdressers may return

Phase 3 – date to be agreed (subject to change)

The following easements are encouraged from this date.

- No restriction on number of people but limited to two households twice a week.
- Overnight stays away from the Home may be facilitated.