Melmount Manor – The Dennett’s Christmas Project patchwork quilt begins

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Melmount Manor’s creative hands get to work on their upcoming festive patchwork quilt.

Nurse Hayley and Activity Co-ordinator Sophie are leading the team of residents to create their Christmas Quilt. They have received pieces of fabric from various visitors and staff. Pieces of fabric woven in Northern Ireland and donated by Liz the owner of Lizzienellie’s dress making cottage in Randalstown.  Spot the hounds tooth fabric!

What you need to know about patchwork quilting ( a lesson for all you history boffins) …

Patchwork and quilting have been practised as both practical and decorative crafts for centuries.  Their popularity has fluctuated according to changes in society and styles have developed according to resources available and the social status of the maker. Through a rich and interesting history the crafts have emerged as popular, relevant and widely practised in the 21st century, building on traditional skills and experimenting with contemporary artistic techniques.

Little is known about patchwork and quilting before the 18th century, and there are few surviving examples. The Quilters’ Guild Collection contains one of the earliest known dated patchworks, the 1718 Silk Patchwork Coverlet. Made by piecing over paper templates, the expensive silks used have been kept and treasured for decades before they were incorporated into the coverlet. Patchwork was a ladies’ leisure pursuit at this time, whilst quilting was considered a professional skill and plain quilts and quilted petticoats were popular, the latter being worn for fashionable daywear. Cialis is a drug widely used in the treatment of problems related to erectile dysfunction. It helps a man feel full-fledged, restores and makes a long-lasting erection. Immediately it should be noted that from the beginning to the withdrawal of the drug from the body of a man takes about 3 days. Read more at tadalafilhome.com.

Technological improvements in textile manufacture led to a fashionable phase of using printed cotton fabrics at the end of the 18th century, which continued in to the early 19th century.  For those who could afford it, expensive and high status printed cottons were often pieced together using the mosaic patchwork method, which also required another expensive commodity –  paper – to produce the templates. Simpler and cheaper fabrics were used by the lower classes in less complicated designs. By the middle of the century cottons were falling out of favour. The advent of roller printing had made cottons cheaper to produce and therefore widened their availability further down the social scale. In 1856 the first synthetic dye, Mauveine, was produced, followed by a vast range of bright colours, and the fashion shifted from printed cottons to vibrant silks and velvets. Mosaic patchwork cushions, throws, table covers and tea cosies adorned the cluttered parlours of Victorian homes. Baby blocks, log cabin, crazy and hexagon patchworks were all popular and often further embellished with embroidery and trimmings.

The late 19th and early 20th century saw the heyday of the Wholecloth quilt, a traditional skill passed on through the generations in Wales, the North Country and the Scottish Borders. In the North Country, quilt ‘stampers’ were professional markers who drew designs onto plain or pieced tops, whilst in Wales professional quilters would travel around making quilts to order. Each area developed their own particular style and popular motifs, with feathers and twisted ropes common in the North Country and leaves and spirals often found in Wales.

The 20th century was a time of great fluctuation. The interruption of two world wars and a dramatic shift in society led to a scarcity of available materials and decline in traditional skills. Competition from commercially manufactured alternatives meant traditional quilts seemed time consuming and undesirable. However, some people could still see their value, and continued to practise, teach and research patchwork and quilting, leading to an eventual resurgence of interest in the 1960s and ’70s. In 1979 The Quilters’ Guild was formed with the intention of ensuring the traditional crafts of patchwork and quilting were passed on, and to represent a new wave of quilters to take the craft into the 21st century.

Melmount residents and staff carry on this very worthwhile traditional craft, an art that can be enjoyed by all. Residents, relatives and staff are very excited about this new project and all looking forward to the finished item for Christmas.

Any fabric pieces gratefully accepted.

Larchwood Care (NI) Limited
First Floor

Unit 16 Crescent Industrial Estate
Ballinderry Road
Lisburn

BT28 2GN

Tel: 028 92 669 360

22 February 2021

Dear (Next of Kin),

Further to my last statement , you will be aware that we took the decision in January to close to all visiting as we witnessed a province wide increase in transmission of COVID-19.  This decision was not taken lightly and in keeping with our core values sought to provide protection to your loved ones.

We recognise the last 12 months has been extremely challenging for families who have been separated from their loved ones in an effort to keep them safe.  We thank everyone for their understanding and their resolve to work with us in protecting the most vulnerable and preventing where possible the spread of the virus to residents and staff.  Your support has been an invaluable part of working together to keep residents safe.

During this time many of you will have availed of virtual and window visits, which remain the safest means to keep in contact with residents.

In the last 6 weeks there have been many positive developments, including the roll out of the vaccine to residents and the decrease in community transmission.  We also acknowledge, in line with the executive’s announcement of continued restrictions, there is a need for continued vigilance and risk management.  In developing and re-establishing  the visiting policy for Larchwood Care Homes we have taken all these matters into consideration and believe that the following arrangements provide the necessary balance for safe visiting.  The following sets out the opportunities available in all Homes.

Virtual and Window Visiting

These visits have been available throughout the last 12 months and can be still be facilitated in all Homes.  Window visitors are reminded that they must still wear a face mask during visits.  Visits are available 7 days a week and if you do not require staff to support your visit there is no restriction on visiting times or duration.

If staff are required to facilitate or support these visits please make contact with the Home at the assigned booking times of Monday – Friday 1000 – 1100 hours or 1400-1500 hours to request this support.

End of Life Visiting

Throughout the last 12 months we have recognised that the last moments are precious and have continued to facilitate these visiting arrangements for residents who are in the last days of their life.  If you find yourself in this position, special compassionate arrangements will be facilitated through the Home Manager or Nurse in Charge.  Often the Home will make contact with you to arrange these, but if you have urgent need to contact us at any time to book access to your loved one.

Care Partners

A Care Partner is defined as an individual who has previously played a role in supporting and attending to their relative’s physical and mental health, and/or provided specific support and assistance to ensure that communication or other health and social care needs are met due to a pre-existing condition.  These arrangements which have been in place within all Homes permit an individual to be designated as a Care Partner, however the next of kin must make contact with the Home Manager to advise of this nomination.

Two individuals can be nominated for a resident as Care Partners.  We will facilitate either of these nominees a maximum of 2 visits between them per week.  The total visit time will be no longer than 45 minutes.  Care Partners must book their visit by contacting the Home at the assigned booking times of Monday – Friday 1000 – 1100 hours or 1400-1500 hours.

Care Partners will be tested weekly as part of the Care Home staff testing programme.  Upon arrival at the Home the Care Partner will have their temperature taken and supported to don full PPE.  They will then be escorted to the room of their loved one.  Care Partners are not permitted to engage with any other resident whilst in the building.

Non Care Partner Visits (General Visits)

In addition to care partners, from Monday 1 March 2021, Larchwood Care will be facilitating non-care-partner visiting in all Homes.  These general visits can either be accommodated in the designated visiting area or in resident rooms for those who are unable to come to the visiting area.

All general visits must be pre-booked and you will be asked a series of risk assessment questions as part of this booking process.  Booking can take place Monday – Friday 1000 – 1100 hours or 1400-1500 hours, by phoning the Care Home.  General visits will accommodate one person to visit once per week.  Visitors must be over the age of 18 years.

In facilitating this wide range of visiting activities and care partner arrangements you will understand the burden placed on staff time to undertake the administration and facilitation of these.  Each Home will therefore have a maximum number of general and virtual visits available per week and we would ask that all relatives, family and friends are understanding of this.

All visitors, including Care Partners, in their daily lives are reminded of the need to ensure good personal hygiene, use of face coverings as required and to exercise their judgement on the need to use public transport for the benefit of all residents and staff in the Home.

Yours sincerely,

Nuala Green

Managing Director